Pilot: TSA's porno pics and genital groping are unconstitutional

The Constitution guarantees that “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated.”

Images produced by the new airport full-body scanners are so vivid and revealing as to be pornographic. And the alternative, if you refuse letting the government take porno photos, is an “enhanced pat-down”… having your genitals groped by some TSA employee. (Didn’t we learn after “enhanced interrogation” that we shouldn’t entrust government with the ability to “enhance” anything in the name of national security?!?!)

Forcing millions of Americans to choose either a porno pic or genital groping seems pretty “unreasonable” to me, esp. since these scanners and invasive “enhanced pat-downs” haven’t — to my knowledge — caught a single terrorist. The idea that we’re going to stop the next 9/11 by frisking pilots' and passengers' genitals is insane. Terrorists can think of a million ways to kill Americans, and genital groping of airline passengers won’t stop them. They can still drive a truck full of plastic explosives into a crowd, for example. The idea that we can make America completely safe by photographing and feeling enough airline passengers' genitals is ridiculous.

This clearly violates the Constitution. So I’m glad this pilot is challenging the TSA’s illegal rule:

Michael Roberts, a pilot for ExpressJet Airlines, refused a full-body scan last week at a Transportation Security Administration check point at Memphis International Airport in Memphis, Tennessee.

Opting out of scanning is permitted, but those who opt out must receive an enhanced pat down from a TSA employee.

“Pat down is misleading,” Roberts said. “They concentrate on the area between … the upper thighs and torso, and they’re not just patting people’s arms and legs, they’re grabbing and groping and prodding pretty aggressively.”

Roberts said TSA security measures are ineffective, and cited concerns for his rights and privacy in refusing the procedures.

“I was trying to avoid this assault on my person, and I’m not willing to have images of my nude body produced for some stranger in another room to look at either,” Roberts told CNN.

Posted by James on Thursday, October 21, 2010